Mexico Launches Plan to Stimulate US Border Economy  

President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador has launched an ambitious plan to stimulate economic activity on the Mexican side of the U.S.-Mexico border despite recent U.S. threats to close the border entirely.

Mexico plans to slash income and corporate taxes to 20 percent from 30 percent for 43 municipalities in six states just south of the U.S., while halving to 8 percent the value-added tax in the region.

Business leaders and union representatives have also agreed to double the minimum wage along the border, to 176.2 pesos a day, the equivalent of $9.07 at current exchange rates.

Lopez Obrador says the idea is to stimulate wage and job growth via fiscal incentives and productivity gains.

U.S. President Donald Trump has repeatedly complained that low wages in Mexico lure jobs from the U.S. 

 

Mexico Launches Plan to Stimulate US Border Economy  

President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador has launched an ambitious plan to stimulate economic activity on the Mexican side of the U.S.-Mexico border despite recent U.S. threats to close the border entirely.

Mexico plans to slash income and corporate taxes to 20 percent from 30 percent for 43 municipalities in six states just south of the U.S., while halving to 8 percent the value-added tax in the region.

Business leaders and union representatives have also agreed to double the minimum wage along the border, to 176.2 pesos a day, the equivalent of $9.07 at current exchange rates.

Lopez Obrador says the idea is to stimulate wage and job growth via fiscal incentives and productivity gains.

U.S. President Donald Trump has repeatedly complained that low wages in Mexico lure jobs from the U.S. 

 

Airports Seeing Rise in Security Screeners Calling off Work

The federal agency tasked with guaranteeing U.S. airport security is acknowledging an increase in the number of its employees calling off work during the partial government shutdown.

The Transportation Security Administration said in a Friday tweet that call outs that began over the holiday period are on the rise but the impact has been “minimal.” The agency said wait times may be affected but so far “remain well within TSA standards.”

 

TSA employees are expected to work without pay during the shutdown because they are considered essential.

The Department of Homeland Security and President Donald Trump pushed back Saturday on suggestions that the absences represented a “sickout” that was having significant consequences on U.S. air travel.

Airports Seeing Rise in Security Screeners Calling off Work

The federal agency tasked with guaranteeing U.S. airport security is acknowledging an increase in the number of its employees calling off work during the partial government shutdown.

The Transportation Security Administration said in a Friday tweet that call outs that began over the holiday period are on the rise but the impact has been “minimal.” The agency said wait times may be affected but so far “remain well within TSA standards.”

 

TSA employees are expected to work without pay during the shutdown because they are considered essential.

The Department of Homeland Security and President Donald Trump pushed back Saturday on suggestions that the absences represented a “sickout” that was having significant consequences on U.S. air travel.

Moscow: Russian’s Detention Preceded Ex-Marine’s Arrest

The Russian Foreign Ministry said on Saturday the United States had detained a Russian citizen a day after Moscow arrested the former U.S. Marine Paul Whelan on suspicion of spying.

Whelan was taken into custody by Russia’s Federal Security Service on Dec. 28. His family have said he is innocent and that he was in Moscow to attend a wedding.

The ministry said the United States detained Russian citizen Dmitry Makarenko on Dec. 29 on the Northern Mariana Islands, a U.S. commonwealth in the Pacific Ocean, and had transferred him to Florida.

“Makarenko, born in 1979, has arrived on Saipan Island with his wife, underage children and elderly parents. He was detained by FBI personnel at the airport right after his arrival,” the ministry said.

The U.S. Embassy in Moscow could not immediately be reached for comment. A State Department spokesman in Washington referred a request for comment to the Department of Justice, which did not immediately respond.

Papers filed in U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida show Makarenko was accused in June 2017 by federal prosecutors of conspiring with another man, Vladimir Nevidomy, to export defense articles including night-vision scopes from the United States to Russia without U.S. approval.

Nevidomy pleaded guilty in the case in June 2018 and was sentenced to 26 months in prison, the court papers showed. The accusations from both sides could further complicate a strained relationship between Moscow and Washington, despite the professed desire of Presidents Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin to build a personal rapport.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said this week that Washington had asked Moscow to explain Whelan’s arrest and would demand his immediate return if it determined his detention is

inappropriate.

Britain cautioned Russia on Friday that individuals should not be used as diplomatic pawns. Whelan also holds a British passport.

The Russian ministry said in its statement that Moscow diplomats had not been able to reach Makarenko in Florida and said Washington had yet to explain his detention. Before Moscow gave details of Makarenko’s detention, experts had speculated that Moscow could exchange Whelan for Russian nationals held by Washington.

Commenting on that possibility, Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov said on Saturday: “I see no reasons to raise this issue in context of exchanges. We should undergo all the procedures needed in this situation,” Interfax news agency quoted Ryabkov as saying.

Whelan’s Toronto-based twin brother David Whelan told Reuters on Saturday that U.S. embassy officials met with his sibling on Wednesday and would visit him again next week.

“He seemed as well as can be expected in a Russian jail. He was missing a lot of personal necessities, like toilet paper, that aren’t provided,” David Whelan said in a telephone interview.

“So the State Department has helped us set up an account … so that he can buy the supplies that he needs.”

Moscow: Russian’s Detention Preceded Ex-Marine’s Arrest

The Russian Foreign Ministry said on Saturday the United States had detained a Russian citizen a day after Moscow arrested the former U.S. Marine Paul Whelan on suspicion of spying.

Whelan was taken into custody by Russia’s Federal Security Service on Dec. 28. His family have said he is innocent and that he was in Moscow to attend a wedding.

The ministry said the United States detained Russian citizen Dmitry Makarenko on Dec. 29 on the Northern Mariana Islands, a U.S. commonwealth in the Pacific Ocean, and had transferred him to Florida.

“Makarenko, born in 1979, has arrived on Saipan Island with his wife, underage children and elderly parents. He was detained by FBI personnel at the airport right after his arrival,” the ministry said.

The U.S. Embassy in Moscow could not immediately be reached for comment. A State Department spokesman in Washington referred a request for comment to the Department of Justice, which did not immediately respond.

Papers filed in U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida show Makarenko was accused in June 2017 by federal prosecutors of conspiring with another man, Vladimir Nevidomy, to export defense articles including night-vision scopes from the United States to Russia without U.S. approval.

Nevidomy pleaded guilty in the case in June 2018 and was sentenced to 26 months in prison, the court papers showed. The accusations from both sides could further complicate a strained relationship between Moscow and Washington, despite the professed desire of Presidents Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin to build a personal rapport.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said this week that Washington had asked Moscow to explain Whelan’s arrest and would demand his immediate return if it determined his detention is

inappropriate.

Britain cautioned Russia on Friday that individuals should not be used as diplomatic pawns. Whelan also holds a British passport.

The Russian ministry said in its statement that Moscow diplomats had not been able to reach Makarenko in Florida and said Washington had yet to explain his detention. Before Moscow gave details of Makarenko’s detention, experts had speculated that Moscow could exchange Whelan for Russian nationals held by Washington.

Commenting on that possibility, Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov said on Saturday: “I see no reasons to raise this issue in context of exchanges. We should undergo all the procedures needed in this situation,” Interfax news agency quoted Ryabkov as saying.

Whelan’s Toronto-based twin brother David Whelan told Reuters on Saturday that U.S. embassy officials met with his sibling on Wednesday and would visit him again next week.

“He seemed as well as can be expected in a Russian jail. He was missing a lot of personal necessities, like toilet paper, that aren’t provided,” David Whelan said in a telephone interview.

“So the State Department has helped us set up an account … so that he can buy the supplies that he needs.”

New House Democrats Get Early Political Lesson

The education of the star-studded class of House freshmen has begun.

Lesson one: Speaking with the bluntness of a candidate can produce swift and uncomfortable results.

Rep. Rashida Tlaib learned that before lunch Friday, when her profane remarks the night before vowing to impeach President Donald Trump drew almost no support, and plenty of pushback, from members of her party.

“It’s been pretty intense,” Tlaib, D-Mich., told The Associated Press in a brief hallway interview Friday as she reported to the House to face her colleagues.

Hours after Tlaib was sworn in as part of the history-making class of freshmen that helped flip the House to Democratic control, she ran afoul of the widespread sense among her colleagues that they should focus for now on health care and other policies rather than impeachment — at least until special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation concludes.

“We’re gonna impeach the motherf—er,” Tlaib exclaimed during a party Thursday night hosted by the liberal activist group MoveOn, according to video and comments on Twitter.

It was a striking coda to the Democrats’ heady ascendance to the House majority Thursday, sparking unusually public corrections from House veterans.

“I disagree with what she said,” said House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., during a CNN interview. His committee would be the one to begin impeachment proceedings.

“It is too early to talk about that intelligently,” Nadler said. “We have to follow the facts.”

Newcomers routinely stumble as they learn how things are done on Capitol Hill. But Tlaib and her classmates have been celebrated in magazine profiles for their independence and their promises to stand up to the powers that be. By rebuking one, the more seasoned Democrats were effectively warning the others.

“I think some of our new members probably don’t realize that you are always on, that when you are a member of Congress, there’s always someone listening,” said Rep. Jan Schakowsky, D-Ill. She said she hopes Tlaib’s remarks aren’t news for long.

More than Tlaib’s profanity, it was her vow to impeach Trump that drew her colleagues’ disapproval.

Tlaib’s defiance flew in the face of Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s warning to focus on policies the candidates had promised ahead of the Nov. 6 elections. The timing also chafed, just hours before congressional leaders were headed to the White House to try to resolve the standoff over the border wall Trump is demanding in exchange for reopening the government. Republicans pounced, using the occasion to question the Democrats’ true priorities and Pelosi’s leadership.

With a tight smile, Pelosi rejected Tlaib’s profanity and her impeachment vow.

“That is not the position of the House Democratic caucus,” Pelosi said on MSNBC of Tlaib’s comments. “I don’t think we should make a big deal of it.”

Rep. Gerry Connolly, D-Va., served up a reminder to the new members that seniority rules in Congress.

“She’s a freshman. It’s her first day here,” Connolly said of Tlaib. “She went in front of an enthusiastic crowd of her supporters and it was red meat for them. She yielded to that temptation.”

“I’m sure upon reflection,” Connolly suggested, “she might choose other words to describe her feelings.”

Talk of impeachment remains in the air, fueled by a handful of Democrats on Pelosi’s left flank who are pressuring her to more aggressively pursue the issue. But such proceedings appear unlikely for now. Even if the House advances any articles of impeachment, a two-thirds-majority vote to convict Trump in the Republican-controlled Senate and remove him from office would seem out of the question, barring astonishing new revelations.

Tlaib wasn’t the only freshman who got a lesson in how one comment can upend Capitol Hill.

Some of Tlaib’s classmates were pursued for reaction — standard results when a political ally says something that raises eyebrows.

“I am not talking about those things,” laughed Rep. Abigail Spanberger, D-Va., when asked Friday to respond to Tlaib’s remarks.

She said she was elected because she talked about preserving health care. “I’m not going to tell anyone else what to do, but certainly, I think, it would behoove all of us to really be working for the people who need” Congress’ help.

New House Democrats Get Early Political Lesson

The education of the star-studded class of House freshmen has begun.

Lesson one: Speaking with the bluntness of a candidate can produce swift and uncomfortable results.

Rep. Rashida Tlaib learned that before lunch Friday, when her profane remarks the night before vowing to impeach President Donald Trump drew almost no support, and plenty of pushback, from members of her party.

“It’s been pretty intense,” Tlaib, D-Mich., told The Associated Press in a brief hallway interview Friday as she reported to the House to face her colleagues.

Hours after Tlaib was sworn in as part of the history-making class of freshmen that helped flip the House to Democratic control, she ran afoul of the widespread sense among her colleagues that they should focus for now on health care and other policies rather than impeachment — at least until special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation concludes.

“We’re gonna impeach the motherf—er,” Tlaib exclaimed during a party Thursday night hosted by the liberal activist group MoveOn, according to video and comments on Twitter.

It was a striking coda to the Democrats’ heady ascendance to the House majority Thursday, sparking unusually public corrections from House veterans.

“I disagree with what she said,” said House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., during a CNN interview. His committee would be the one to begin impeachment proceedings.

“It is too early to talk about that intelligently,” Nadler said. “We have to follow the facts.”

Newcomers routinely stumble as they learn how things are done on Capitol Hill. But Tlaib and her classmates have been celebrated in magazine profiles for their independence and their promises to stand up to the powers that be. By rebuking one, the more seasoned Democrats were effectively warning the others.

“I think some of our new members probably don’t realize that you are always on, that when you are a member of Congress, there’s always someone listening,” said Rep. Jan Schakowsky, D-Ill. She said she hopes Tlaib’s remarks aren’t news for long.

More than Tlaib’s profanity, it was her vow to impeach Trump that drew her colleagues’ disapproval.

Tlaib’s defiance flew in the face of Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s warning to focus on policies the candidates had promised ahead of the Nov. 6 elections. The timing also chafed, just hours before congressional leaders were headed to the White House to try to resolve the standoff over the border wall Trump is demanding in exchange for reopening the government. Republicans pounced, using the occasion to question the Democrats’ true priorities and Pelosi’s leadership.

With a tight smile, Pelosi rejected Tlaib’s profanity and her impeachment vow.

“That is not the position of the House Democratic caucus,” Pelosi said on MSNBC of Tlaib’s comments. “I don’t think we should make a big deal of it.”

Rep. Gerry Connolly, D-Va., served up a reminder to the new members that seniority rules in Congress.

“She’s a freshman. It’s her first day here,” Connolly said of Tlaib. “She went in front of an enthusiastic crowd of her supporters and it was red meat for them. She yielded to that temptation.”

“I’m sure upon reflection,” Connolly suggested, “she might choose other words to describe her feelings.”

Talk of impeachment remains in the air, fueled by a handful of Democrats on Pelosi’s left flank who are pressuring her to more aggressively pursue the issue. But such proceedings appear unlikely for now. Even if the House advances any articles of impeachment, a two-thirds-majority vote to convict Trump in the Republican-controlled Senate and remove him from office would seem out of the question, barring astonishing new revelations.

Tlaib wasn’t the only freshman who got a lesson in how one comment can upend Capitol Hill.

Some of Tlaib’s classmates were pursued for reaction — standard results when a political ally says something that raises eyebrows.

“I am not talking about those things,” laughed Rep. Abigail Spanberger, D-Va., when asked Friday to respond to Tlaib’s remarks.

She said she was elected because she talked about preserving health care. “I’m not going to tell anyone else what to do, but certainly, I think, it would behoove all of us to really be working for the people who need” Congress’ help.

УПЦ (МП) відреагувала на підписання томосу про автокефалію для української церкви

Підписання томосу про автокефалію для Православної церкви України відбулося з порушенням «усіх фундаментальних канонічних правил», заявив представник Української православної церкви (Московського патріархату) архієпископ Климент у коментарі ТАСС.

«Цей документ створений і підписаний з ігноруванням всіх фундаментальних канонічних правил, за якими живе не тільки наша церква, а й всі інші помісні церкви», – заявив Климент.

15 грудня 2018 року в Києві в Софійському соборі відбувся Об’єднавчий собор для створення єдиної української помісної православної церкви, який обрав її предстоятелем митрополита Епіфанія.

5 січня Вселенський патріарх Варфоломій під час церемонії у Стамбулі підписав томос про автокефалію для Православної церкви України. Російська православна церква розкритикувала цей крок і заявила, що Варфоломій «остаточно відірвав себе від світового православ’я».

6 січня після божественної літургії документ про автокефалію вручать предстоятелю Православної церкви України митрополитові Епіфанію.

 

 

 

НА ЦЮ Ж ТЕМУ:

Вселенський патріарх підписав томос для Православної церкви України

Філарет про Собор, конкурентів Епіфанія і шантаж КДБ

Парламент ухвалив рішення щодо перейменування УПЦ (МП) в Російську православну церкву

УПЦ (МП) у Криму благословляє окупантів на захист Росії і освячує їхню зброю

УПЦ (МП) допомагала Гіркіну готувати анексію Криму – СБУ

УПЦ (МП) відреагувала на підписання томосу про автокефалію для української церкви

Підписання томосу про автокефалію для Православної церкви України відбулося з порушенням «усіх фундаментальних канонічних правил», заявив представник Української православної церкви (Московського патріархату) архієпископ Климент у коментарі ТАСС.

«Цей документ створений і підписаний з ігноруванням всіх фундаментальних канонічних правил, за якими живе не тільки наша церква, а й всі інші помісні церкви», – заявив Климент.

15 грудня 2018 року в Києві в Софійському соборі відбувся Об’єднавчий собор для створення єдиної української помісної православної церкви, який обрав її предстоятелем митрополита Епіфанія.

5 січня Вселенський патріарх Варфоломій під час церемонії у Стамбулі підписав томос про автокефалію для Православної церкви України. Російська православна церква розкритикувала цей крок і заявила, що Варфоломій «остаточно відірвав себе від світового православ’я».

6 січня після божественної літургії документ про автокефалію вручать предстоятелю Православної церкви України митрополитові Епіфанію.

 

 

 

НА ЦЮ Ж ТЕМУ:

Вселенський патріарх підписав томос для Православної церкви України

Філарет про Собор, конкурентів Епіфанія і шантаж КДБ

Парламент ухвалив рішення щодо перейменування УПЦ (МП) в Російську православну церкву

УПЦ (МП) у Криму благословляє окупантів на захист Росії і освячує їхню зброю

УПЦ (МП) допомагала Гіркіну готувати анексію Криму – СБУ